ENVIRONMENTAL INDICATORS
Materials
103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary a. An explanation of why the topic is material.   Many materials are required at different stages of the gold production process. We monitor materials deemed to be significant, which includes explosives, tires and energy used for mining activities and the reagents used for mineral processing.

The materials reported are significant because they are considered critical inputs to extract our final product and have the potential to result in environmental impacts if not managed appropriately. Other materials used by mining and milling activities are not considered to be significant because they generally present less risk and tend to be used in smaller quantities.
b. The Boundary for the material topic, which includes a description of:
i. where the impacts occur;
ii. the organization’s involvement with the impacts. For example, whether the organization has caused or contributed to the impacts, or is directly linked to the impacts through its business relationships.
This topic boundary is limited to materials provided by various company suppliers to IAMGOLD managed operations and advanced exploration sites.

Mining is a primary industry. As IAMGOLD is a producer of primary raw materials (gold) with final products transported in bulk, materials used for packaging are considered non-material.
c. Any specific limitation regarding the topic Boundary. Materials used at exploration and closed sites are not considered significant as there are no active production or mineral processing activities. Additionally, joint venture projects where IAMGOLD is not the operator are not included.
103-2 The management approach and its components  a. An explanation of how the organization manages the topic.   Material inventories are tracked and updated routinely at all IAMGOLD managed operations. Recycling, reusing, and reclaiming of input materials within mining and milling operations are encouraged, where feasible. Additional opportunities for salvage are also explored.
b. A statement of the purpose of the management approach.

The purpose of management of this topic is to:

  • Optimize the use of input materials; and
  • Ensure materials are handled, stored and transported appropriately to prevent accidental release to the surrounding environment.
c. A description of the following, if the management approach includes that component:
i. Policies
ii. Commitments
iii. Goals and targets
iv. Responsibilities
v. Resources
vi. Grievance mechanisms
vii. Specific actions, such as processes, projects, programs and initiatives

Sustainability Policy

The IAMGOLD Sustainability Policy, signed by the CEO, outlines our commitment to continual improvement in environmental protection, pollution prevention, community awareness and economic performance.

Sites are expected to meet or exceed relevant laws and regulations. All of our sites have procedures in place for the safe transport, storage, handling and disposal of cyanide and other hazardous substances. Further, continuous improvement programs have been implemented to increase efficiency in the use of explosives and fuels.

103-3 Evaluation of the management approach For each material topic, the reporting organization shall report the following information:
a. An explanation of how the organization evaluates the management approach, including:
i. the mechanisms for evaluating the effectiveness of the management approach;
ii. the results of the evaluation of the management approach;
iii. any related adjustments to the management approach.
Audits and verification of the effectiveness of management of this topic are conducted on a site-level basis.

As a member of the Mining Association of Canada (MAC), IAMGOLD adheres to the Towards Sustainable Mining (TSM) protocols at all our sites. Every three years, it is required that an external verification be conducted to verify level of adherence with the TSM protocols. An internal audit was conducted on tailings and a TSM audit was conducted in 2018. The results of the audit are currently being reviewed to identify areas for improvement.
301-1 Materials used by weight or volume DETAILS +
Disclosure Required Rosebel Essakane Westwood
a. Total weight or volume of non-renewable materials (listed below) used during the reporting period (tonnes):
i. Cyanide 5,499.90 7,074.00 676.96
ii. Acid 1,998.10 1,002.00 5.62
iii. Flocculant 175.70 345.00 34.78
iv. Caustic soda 730.76 1,450.00 110.13
v. Lime 11,094.00 13,724.00 5,592.36
vi. Explosives 15,092.82 0.00 1,510.41
vii. Other (specified below):
2“ balls 4,786.60 0.00 0.00
5“ balls 1,645.38 0.00 0.00
Anti-scalant 91.00 0.00 0.00
Other types of oil (compressor oil, differential oil and others) 0.00 117.37 0.00
Carbon 523.10 0.00 0.00
Compressor oil 29.10 0.00 0.00
Cutting oil 0.09 0.00 0.00
Diesel 44,710.35 0.00 0.00
Engine oil 366.46 384.31 0.00
Ferric sulphate (Fe2(SO4)3) 61.80 0.00 0.00
Grease 58.51 76.00 0.00
Hydraulic oil 870.01 39.30 0.00
Kluber fluid 11.70 0.00 0.00
Motor/drill oil 61.05 0.00 0.00
Sulfur dioxide (SO2) 0.00 0.00 1,073.79
Transmission oil 335.92 518.49 0.00
b. Total weight or volume of any renewable materials used during the reporting period (tonnes): 0.00 717.00 0.00
i. Cyanide 0.00 717.00 0.00
ii. Other Not applicable
Energy
103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary a. An explanation of why the topic is material.   Use of energy contributes to greenhouse gas (GHG) production and is a significant operating cost.
b. The Boundary for the material topic, which includes a description of:
i. where the impacts occur;
ii. the organization’s involvement with the impacts. For example, whether the organization has caused or contributed to the impacts, or is directly linked to the impacts through its business relationships.
This topic boundary includes energy use at IAMGOLD managed operations and exploration sites. Energy intensive activities include crushing, grinding, ventilation, pumping, transport, and drilling.
c. Any specific limitation regarding the topic Boundary. Energy use at closed sites is not considered significant as there are no active production or mineral processing activities. Additionally, joint venture projects where IAMGOLD is not the operator are not included.
103-2 The management approach and its components  a. An explanation of how the organization manages the topic.  

Energy use is regularly tracked and assessed to identify opportunities to improve energy efficiency, reduce GHG emissions, and promote energy conservation and the use of renewable energy.

At Essakane, the site pickup truck optimization initiative saved 15,577 L of gasoline in 2016 and 88,718 L in 2017.

At Rosebel, several initiatives reduced total energy use by 40,765.4 kWh. Outside lighting, spotlights and ceiling lights of the administration kitchen were replaced with LEDs resulting in estimated energy savings of 4,481 kWh. Camp A2 building lights and walkway lights were also replaced with LEDs resulting in energy savings of 23,684.4 kWh. The installation of a heater pump at one Camp B building resulted in energy savings of 12,600 kWh.

IAMGOLD is committed to renewable energy as exemplified by the development of the world’s largest hybrid photovoltaic heavy fuel oil plant (PV-HFO) of 15 MW at Essakane and a 5 MW solar power plant at Rosebel, as well as several smaller solar projects in support of local communities in Suriname. The 15 MW PV-HFO plant at Essakane is estimated to save around 6 million litres of fuel per year.

b. A statement of the purpose of the management approach.

As per the Towards Sustainable Mining (TSM) initiative, the purpose of management of this topic is to:

  • Optimize energy use and promote use of renewable sources;
  • Comply with applicable regulatory requirements; and
  • Reduce operating costs.
c. A description of the following, if the management approach includes that component:
i. Policies
ii. Commitments
iii. Goals and targets
iv. Responsibilities
v. Resources
vi. Grievance mechanisms
vii. Specific actions, such as processes, projects, programs and initiatives

Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Management Standard

As per IAMGOLD's Energy and Greenhouse Gases Emissions Management Standard, we recognize that efficient management of energy is required to achieve our business strategy and provide benefits to our stakeholders. Further, effective energy management will directly contribute to operational cost improvements and help mitigate environmental impacts. Our key energy management objectives are to continuously improve energy performance, and support the introduction of clean and renewable energy.

One of our priority goals is to increase the proportion of renewable energy for the company's total energy requirements (target 15% of power generated by renewables).

We participate in the Carbon Disclosure Project (CDP) Climate Change Disclosure.

103-3 Evaluation of the management approach For each material topic, the reporting organization shall report the following information:
a. An explanation of how the organization evaluates the management approach, including:
i. the mechanisms for evaluating the effectiveness of the management approach;
ii. the results of the evaluation of the management approach;
iii. any related adjustments to the management approach.

As a member of the Mining Association of Canada (MAC), IAMGOLD adheres to the Towards Sustainable Mining (TSM) protocols at all our sites. Every three years, it is required that an external verification be conducted to verify level of adherence with the TSM protocols. An internal audit was conducted on tailings and a TSM audit was conducted in 2018. The results of the audit are currently being reviewed to identify areas for improvement.

All IAMGOLD operations conducted the annual TSM self-assessment for the Energy and GHG Emissions Management Protocol. Annual results are available in the TSM Progress Reports.

302-1 Energy consumption within the organization DETAILS +
Disclosure Required Rosebel Essakane Westwood Corporate Exploration
a. Total fuel consumption from non-renewable sources (listed below) during the reporting period, in GJ or appropriate unit:
Diesel 2,030,936.92 1,546,664.72 102,238.71 Mali: 13,486 GJ
Senegal: 282,831 L
Colombia: 2,143.4 gallons
Brazil: 6,912 L
Ontario: 769 GJ
Peru: 6,900 gallons
Quebec: 114,000 L
Suriname: 313,406 L
Burkina Faso: 269,799 L
Gasoline 0.00 991.37 2,411.26 Mali: not applicable
Senegal: not applicable
Colombia: 2,143.4 gallons
Brazil: 5,594 L
Ontario: 16,151 GJ
Peru: 1,090 gallons
Quebec: 14,200 L
Suriname: 5,969 L
Burkina Faso: not applicable
Propane 4,363.80 0.00 0.00 Mali: not applicable
Senegal: not applicable
Colombia: 520 lbs
Brazil: not applicable
Ontario: 5,937 GJ
Peru: not applicable
Quebec: not applicable
Suriname: not applicable
Burkina Faso: not applicable
Natural gas 0.00 0.00 93,365.06 Mali: not applicable
Senegal: not applicable
Colombia: not applicable
Brazil: not applicable
Ontario: not applicable
Peru: not applicable
Quebec: 2,000 m³
Suriname: not applicable
Burkina Faso: not applicable
Fuel oil 0.00 2,818,610.23 0.00 Mali: not applicable
Senegal: not applicable
Colombia: not applicable
Brazil: not applicable
Ontario: not applicable
Peru: not applicable
Quebec: not applicable
Suriname: $1,716.94 USD
Burkina Faso: not applicable
Acetylene 199.68 172.47 30.32 Not applicable
Kerosene 0.00 6,553.99 0.00 Not applicable
Other Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Mali: not applicable
Senegal: 690 kg (butane)
Colombia: not applicable
Brazil: not applicable
Ontario: not applicable
Peru: not applicable
Quebec: not applicable
Suriname: not applicable
Burkina Faso: not applicable
Total 2,035,500.39 4,372,992.79 198,045.35 Mali: 13,486 GJ
Brazil: 12,506 L
Ontario: 22,857 GJ
Peru: 8,050 gallons
Burkina Faso: 269,799 L
b. Total fuel consumption from renewable sources (listed below) during the reporting period, in GJ or appropriate unit:
Solar 23,734.80 0.00 0.00 Mali: 0.233 GJ
Senegal: not applicable
Colombia: not applicable
Brazil: not applicable
Ontario: not applicable
Peru: not applicable
Quebec: not applicable
Suriname: not applicable
Burkina Faso: not applicable
c. In joules, watt-hours or multiples, the total:
Electricity consumption (GJ) 896,119.20 3,672.00 671,294.50 Mali: 201 GJ
Senegal: 58,420 L diesel
Colombia: not applicable
Brazil: 61,994 kWh
Ontario: 127,247 GJ
Peru: 30,200 kW
Quebec: 6,000 kW
Suriname: 278,878 kWh
Burkina Faso: 85,948 KV
Heating consumption 0.00 0.00 0.00 Mali: not applicable
Senegal: not applicable
Colombia: not applicable
Brazil: not applicable
Ontario: see propane
Peru: not applicable
Quebec: included in the figure above
Suriname: not applicable
Burkina Faso: not applicable
Cooling consumption 0.00 0.00 0.00 Mali: not applicable
Senegal: not applicable
Colombia: not applicable
Brazil: not applicable
Ontario: see propane
Peru: not applicable
Quebec: not applicable
Suriname: not applicable
Burkina Faso: not applicable
Steam consumption 0.00 0.00 0.00 Not applicable
d. In joules, watt-hours or multiples, the total:
Heating sold 0.00 0.00 0.00 Not applicable
Cooling sold 0.00 0.00 0.00 Not applicable
Steam sold 0.00 0.00 0.00 Not applicable
e. Total energy consumption within the organization, in joules or multiples 2,955,354.39 4,376,664.79 869,339.84 Not applicable
f. Standards, methodologies, assumptions, and/or calculation tools used Ecometrica platform used as calculation tool, based on applicable standards and methodologies.
g. Source of the conversion factors used Standardized unit conversion using the Ecometrica platform.
302-3 Energy intensity DETAILS +
Disclosure Required Rosebel Essakane Westwood Corporate Exploration
a. Energy intensity ratio for the organization:
GJ/thousand tonnes of moved ore and waste 45.46 82.63 746.17 68.87 Not applicable
GJ/thousand tonnes of treated ore 230.31 315.07 1,393.45 300.04 Not applicable
GJ/thousand tonnes of mined ore 196.66 370.55 1,678.59 299.92 Not applicable
GJ/tonnes of gold production 327,680.94 357,570.65 245,576.23 330,862.25 Not applicable
GJ/distance travelled (thousand km) 1,398.99 1,727.97 Not available 1,766.30 Not applicable
GJ/Full Time Equivalent (FTE) employees 2,554.33 1,898.77 1,005.02 1,884.05 Not applicable
GJ/thousand CAD revenue ($) 5.90 6.16 4.15 5.77 Not applicable
GJ/ thousand USD revenue ($) 7.66 8.00 5.38 7.50 Not applicable
b. Organization-specific metric (the denominator) chosen to calculate the ratio:
Thousand tonnes of moved ore and waste 65,006.74 52,967.12 1,165.07 119,138.93 Not applicable
Thousand tonnes of treated ore 12,832.07 13,890.95 623.88 27,346.90
Thousand tonnes of mined ore 15,028.00 11,811.23 517.90 27,357.13
Tonnes of gold production 9.02 12.24 3.54 24.80
Distance travelled (thousand km) 2,112.49 2,532.83 0.00 4,645.32
Full Time Equivalent (FTE) employees 1,157.00 2,305.00 865.00 4,355.00
Thousand CAD revenue ($) 500,578.94 710,634.68 209,659.30 1,420,872.92
Thousand USD revenue ($) 385,594.63 547,400.00 161,500.00 1,094,494.63
c. Types of energy included in the intensity ratio; whether fuel, electricity, heating, cooling, steam, or all All All All All Not applicable
d. Whether the ratio uses energy consumption within the organization, outside of it, or both Within the organization
(related to Scope 1 and 2)
Within the organization
(related to Scope 1 and 2)
Within the organization
(related to Scope 1 and 2)
Within the organization
(related to Scope 1 and 2)
Not applicable
302-4 Reduction of energy consumption DETAILS +
Disclosure Required Rosebel Essakane Westwood Corporate Exploration
a. Amount of reduction in energy consumption achieved as a direct result of conservation and efficiency initiatives, in joules or multiples (kWh) 40,765.40 895,807.20 00.00; reduction initiatives not considered material Not applicable
b. Types of energy included in the reductions; whether fuel, electricity, heating, cooling, steam, or all Electricity Fuel Not applicable Not applicable
c. Basis for calculating reductions in energy consumption, such as base year or baseline, including the rationale for choosing it Assumes 2016 as base year. Assumes 2016 as base year. Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
d. Standards, methodologies, assumptions, and/or calculation tools used Operation time of heater pump = 7 months Assumes 0.010097243 MWh/l energy content of diesel Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
Water
103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary a. An explanation of why the topic is material.   Water is a key resource for the gold extraction process and is shared with our host communities. We must be responsible water stewards in our operations.
b. The Boundary for the material topic, which includes a description of:
i. where the impacts occur;
ii. the organization’s involvement with the impacts. For example, whether the organization has caused or contributed to the impacts, or is directly linked to the impacts through its business relationships.
This topic boundary includes water use at IAMGOLD managed operations and advanced exploration sites on a catchment level basis, as available.
c. Any specific limitation regarding the topic Boundary. Water use at exploration and closed sites is not considered significant as there are no active production or mineral processing activities. Additionally, joint venture projects where IAMGOLD is not the operator are not included.
103-2 The management approach and its components  a. An explanation of how the organization manages the topic.  

IAMGOLD is committed to water stewardship. Water quality and quantity are regularly monitored, including water treated and discharged as applicable. Every operation is expected to maintain a water management plan and associated water balance.

b. A statement of the purpose of the management approach.

The purpose of management of this topic is to:

  • Comply with applicable regulatory requirements;
  • Efficiently manage water resources; and
  • Recycle and reuse water for mineral processing, where possible.
c. A description of the following, if the management approach includes that component:
i. Policies
ii. Commitments
iii. Goals and targets
iv. Responsibilities
v. Resources
vi. Grievance mechanisms
vii. Specific actions, such as processes, projects, programs and initiatives

Water Management Standard

As per our Water Management Standard, we recognize the importance of environmentally sustainable and socially equitable water use. We are dedicated to employing efficient water management and water conservation practices to ensure access to clean water for all users, now and in the future. Water management strategies will address all aspects of the operation, including closure planning, reclamation, tailings management, discharge water quality, potable water and groundwater quality.

103-3 Evaluation of the management approach For each material topic, the reporting organization shall report the following information:
a. An explanation of how the organization evaluates the management approach, including:
i. the mechanisms for evaluating the effectiveness of the management approach;
ii. the results of the evaluation of the management approach;
iii. any related adjustments to the management approach.

As a MAC member, IAMGOLD has endorsed the TSM Water Framework.

No external audit on water was conducted for 2017.

In addition, we participate in the Carbon Disclosure Project (CDP) Water Security Disclosure.

303-1 Water withdrawal by source DETAILS +
Disclosure Required Rosebel Essakane Westwood
a. Total volume of water withdrawn (m3) – the sum of all water drawn into the boundaries from all sources during the reporting period: 4,218,860.75 6,454,089.00 3,859,876.00
i. Surface water, including water from wetlands, rivers, lakes, and oceans 0.00 6,244,353.00 665,886.00
ii. Groundwater 218,860.75 209,736.00 783,207.00
iii. Rainwater collected directly and stored by the organization 4,000,000.00 0.00 2,400,882.00
iv. Waste water from another organization 0.00 0.00 0.00
v. Municipal water supplies or other public or private water utilities 0.00 0.00 9,901.00
b. Standards, methodologies, and assumptions used

Groundwater is measured from well readings.

Rainwater is the estimated amount of water stored in the tailings storage facility including rainwater (4,000,000 m3).

Groundwater sourced from wells for domestic use is measured.

Tailings are thickened.

Water volumes are determined using direct measurements.

Surface water from the Rivière Bousquet is used for drilling activities related to underground mining operations.

Groundwater is the water volume from dewatering the mine.

Municipal water supplies the site's potable water needs.

Flowmeters are used to directly measure the volumes of surface water, groundwater, municipal water supply, and the total water discharged from the site.

Rainwater is estimated by subtracting surface water, groundwater and municipal water supply from the total water discharged.

303-3 Water recycled and reused DETAILS +
Disclosure Required Rosebel Essakane Westwood
a. Total volume of water recycled and reused by the organization (m3) 12,036,611.00 7,170,926.00 685,884.00
b. Total volume of water recycled and reused as a percentage of the total water withdrawal as specified in Disclosure 303-1 285% 111% 18%
c. Standards, methodologies, and assumptions used Water sourced from the tailings storage facility is reused for mineral processing needs. Volumes are calculated by engineering.

After mineral processing, the tailings are pumped to a thickener. Thickened tailings are sent to the tailings storage facility.

The thickening process permits the reduction of cyanide consumption in the treatment process and also enables water to be reused for mineral processing, limiting the need for consumption of additional freshwater.

Water from the tailings storage facilities is reused for mineral processing needs. A flowmeter is used to measure quantities.
Biodiversity
103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary a. An explanation of why the topic is material.   IAMGOLD seeks to minimize the impact of our mining activities on the environment and biodiversity from exploration to closure. We recognize that sustaining healthy ecosystems is fundamental in order to achieve our Zero Harm vision.
b. The Boundary for the material topic, which includes a description of:
i. where the impacts occur;
ii. the organization’s involvement with the impacts. For example, whether the organization has caused or contributed to the impacts, or is directly linked to the impacts through its business relationships.
This topic boundary is limited to biodiversity aspects related to IAMGOLD managed operations and advanced exploration sites.
c. Any specific limitation regarding the topic Boundary. Exploration sites are expected to comply with PDAC e3Plus. Biodiversity aspects of closed legacy sites are not currently available. Additionally, joint venture projects where IAMGOLD is not the operator are not included.
103-2 The management approach and its components  a. An explanation of how the organization manages the topic.  

IAMGOLD recognizes that protecting biodiversity and sustaining healthy ecosystems is fundamental for the responsible environmental management of our operations. All sites and business development opportunities are expected to integrate biodiversity management and conservation to demonstrate our due diligence and ensure the reclamation of disturbed ecosystems.

Biodiversity baseline studies are conducted for development projects as part of ESIAs. Environmental effects monitoring (EEM) studies are conducted throughout mining operations. Biodiversity considerations are taken into account during mine closure planning and reclamation activities.

There are hunting restrictions on the concession areas of our operating mines, which has led to positive biodiversity impacts.

b. A statement of the purpose of the management approach.

The purpose of management of this topic is to:

  • Comply with applicable regulatory requirements; and
  • Sustain healthy ecosystems to the extent possible in areas disturbed by our mining activities.
c. A description of the following, if the management approach includes that component:
i. Policies
ii. Commitments
iii. Goals and targets
iv. Responsibilities
v. Resources
vi. Grievance mechanisms
vii. Specific actions, such as processes, projects, programs and initiatives

Sustainability Policy

Biodiversity Policy

Our Sustainability Policy and Biodiversity Policy state that we are committed to integrating biodiversity management and conservation at all stages of our activities, from exploration to mine closure, using the resources and skills necessary to minimize impacts on biodiversity from our activities.

Impacts to aquatic and terrestrial species and measures to avoid or reduce impacts are considered early in the project planning process. Recent environmental assessment (EA) reports, such as the EA report for the Côté Gold project, are available on our website for review.

103-3 Evaluation of the management approach For each material topic, the reporting organization shall report the following information:
a. An explanation of how the organization evaluates the management approach, including:
i. the mechanisms for evaluating the effectiveness of the management approach;
ii. the results of the evaluation of the management approach;
iii. any related adjustments to the management approach.

As a member of the Mining Association of Canada (MAC), IAMGOLD adheres to the Towards Sustainable Mining (TSM) protocols at all our sites. Every three years, it is required that an external verification be conducted to verify level of adherence with the TSM protocols. An internal audit was conducted on tailings and a TSM audit was conducted in 2018. The results of the audit are currently being reviewed to identify areas for improvement.

All IAMGOLD operations conducted the annual TSM self-assessment for the Biodiversity Conservation Management Protocol. Annual results are available in the TSM Progress Reports.

Additionally, environmental and social impact assessments (ESIA) are guided by IFC Performance Standards.

304-1 Operational sites owned, leased, managed in, or adjacent to, protected areas and areas of high biodiversity value outside protected areas DETAILS +
Disclosure Required Rosebel Essakane Westwood
a. For each operational site owned, leased or managed in, or adjacent to, any protected areas and areas of high biodiversity value outside protected areas, the following information:
i. Geographic location Brokopondo District, Suriname Sahel region, Burkina Faso (North East area) Abitibi region of Quebec, Canada
(near Rouyn-Noranda)
ii. Subsurface and underground land that may be owned, leased, or managed by the organization (km2) 170 100 Not applicable
iii. Position in relation to the protected area (in the area, adjacent to, or containing portions of the protected area) or the high biodiversity value area outside protected areas

Two protected areas have been identified near the Gross Rosebel concession.

The Brinckheuvel Nature Reserve is located 3 km west of the concession across the Mindrineti River on the west bank.

The Brownsberg Nature Reserve is located approximately 10 to 15 km southeast of the concession area.

The mining concession is located inside the 1,600,000 hectare Sahel Partial Faunal Reserve. Mining is permitted in this area.

The Sahel Partial Faunal Reserve is a designated zone primarily because of seasonal/intermittent freshwater lakes (Mare d’Oursi, Mare de Yomboli, Mare de Kissi) which are of importance for migratory birds.

La Mare d’Oursi is listed as a Ramsar site. The 45,000 hectare site is located approximately 67 km northwest from Essakane mine.

Not applicable
iv. Type of operation (office, manufacturing or production, or extractive) Extractive Extractive Extractive
v. Size of operational site in km2 35.57 16.61 9.35
vi. Biodiversity value characterized by the attribute of the protected area or area of high biodiversity value outside the protected area (terrestrial, freshwater, or maritime ecosystem)

The ecosystem found on and near the Rosebel Gold Mine (RGM) is part of the savannas of Suriname and Guyana, which is a widespread ecosystem in the region.

Globally, this is a relatively unique ecosystem and one of high biodiversity.

A wildlife survey was started in 2011 and continued in the first quarter of 2012, 2014 and 2017. The next wildlife survey is planned for 2020. Wildlife survey data confirmed that Rosebel areas have a richer mammal fauna as compared to nearby nature reserves. The preliminary report emphasized that the RGM area harbours good populations of several species that are internationally considered as vulnerable or near threatened.

The Sahel region has a very high vulnerability to desertification.

Several species of trees, shrubs and grasses are declining in the region. Forests and steppes located along the Gorouol River and the Feildegasse River are an important habitat for migrating birds, mammals and reptiles.

Not applicable
vii. Biodiversity value characterized by listing of protected status (such as IUCN Protected Area Management Categories, Ramsar Convention, national legislation)

The Ocelot, Margay and Jaguar are in App. I (CITES, 2017). All peccaries, primates, the Brazilian tapir and all cats (except the ones in App. I) are in App. II of CITES.

IUCN Red List species on or around the site:

  • Vulnerable [VU]: Oncilla, White-lipped peccary (Tayassu pecari), Brazilian tapir, Guiana spider monkey
  • Near Threatened [NT]: Bush dog (Speothos venaticus), Jaguar (Panthera onca), Margay (Leopardus wiedii)

IUCN Red List species on or around the site:

  • Vulnerable [VU]: White-headed vulture (Trigonoceps occipitalis)
  • Near Threatened [NT]: Rüppell’s vulture (Gyps rueppellii), Bateleur (Terathopius ecaudatus)
Not applicable
304-2 Significant impacts of activities, products, and services on biodiversity DETAILS +
Disclosure Required Rosebel Essakane Westwood
a. Nature of significant direct and indirect impacts on biodiversity with reference to one or more of the following:
i. Construction or use of manufacturing plants, mines, and transport infrastructure

Direct impact on biodiversity due to habitat loss associated with vegetation clearing and land use for construction of the mineral processing plant, ancillary facilities, transport infrastructure and mining activites.

Land disturbance for 2017 is 3,557 ha.

Reduction of species habitat, land used, soil degradation, and vegetation degradation during the preparation of the Falagountou East Pit, the extension of the waste rock dumps, and the expansion of basins.

Not applicable.

Westwood mine was developed on a brownfield site.

ii. Pollution (introduction of substances that do not naturally occur in the habitat from point and non-point sources) No measurements on pollution level are available to assess the impact on biodiversity. No pollution.

In 2017, work was conducted in the tailings storage facility (TSF) to control the risk of infiltration and to mitigate potential adverse effects to biodiversity.
Not applicable
iii. Introduction of invasive species, pests, and pathogens

Our progressive reclamation program makes use of non-native plant material for revegetation.

This plant material is introduced as seeds of foreign grass species. Young shrubs of non-native species have been planted too. To date, no invasive character of these introduced species can be observed.

No invasive species, pests, or pathogens introduced.

All species used for rehabilitation require validation of the Centre Nationale des Semences Forestières.

Not applicable
iv. Reduction of species The 2017 wildlife survey concluded that populations of the jaguar, armadillo, tayra and collared peccary seem to be decreasing in numbers. Not applicable Not applicable
v. Habitat conversion All the habitats of the disturbed and cleared areas have been converted to open land area. Not applicable Not applicable
vi. Changes in ecological processes outside the natural range of variation (such as salinity or changes in groundwater level) All the habitats of the disturbed and cleared areas have been converted to open land area and therefore their existing ecological function and processes changed. No data available on specific changes. Not applicable Not applicable:
localized impact
b. Significant direct and indirect positive and negative impacts with reference to the following:
i. Species affected No carrying capacity studies conducted on specific species affected. 12 woody species (6,455 feet); herbaceous plants are not inventoried; no data on the micro-level fauna; no significant impact on the macro-level fauna. Not applicable
ii. Extent of areas impacted No data available on extent of areas impacted. 21.63 hectares Not applicable
iii. Duration of impacts Species diversity and evenness are permanently impacted. Permanent for all. Not applicable
iv. Reversibility or irreversibility of the impacts Irreversible most of the time. Irreversible for all. Not applicable
304-3 Habitats protected or restored DETAILS +
Disclosure Required Rosebel Essakane Westwood
a. Size and location of all habitat areas protected or restored (km2 and location) Not applicable La Mare d’Oursi, a 450 km2 Ramsar site and designated ornithological sanctuary, is 67 km from the Essakane site. Not applicable
i. Whether the success of restorative measures approved by independent external professionals (yes/no) No Yes Not applicable
b. Whether partnerships exist with third parties to protect or restore habitat areas distinct from where the organization has overseen and implemented restoration or protection measures (yes/no) No No Not applicable
c. Status of each area based on its condition at the close of the reporting period Not applicable Active Not applicable
d. Report standards, methodologies, and assumptions used Hydroseeding and handplanting for revegetation. Inventory and success rate tracked by species and location. Not applicable
304-4 IUCN Red List species and national conservation list species with habitats in areas affected by operations DETAILS +
Disclosure Required Rosebel Essakane Westwood
Total number of IUCN Red List species and national conservation list species with habitats in areas affected by the operations of the organization, by level of extinction risk: 79 3 Not applicable
i. Critically endangered 0 0 Not applicable
ii. Endangered 0 0 Not applicable
iii. Vulnerable 4
Oncilla, White-lipped peccary (Tayassu pecari), Brazilian tapir, Guiana spider monkey
1
White-headed vulture (Trigonoceps occipitalis)
0
iv. Near threatened 3
Bush dog (Speothos venaticus), Jaguar (Panthera onca), Margay (Leopardus wiedii)
2
Rüppell’s vulture (Gyps rueppellii), Bateleur (Terathopius ecaudatus)
0
v. Least concern 72 Not applicable Not applicable
MM1 Amount of land (owned or leased, and managed for production activities or extractive use) disturbed or rehabilitated DETAILS +
Disclosure Required Rosebel Essakane Westwood
Total land disturbed and not yet rehabilitated (in hectares) 3,422.57 1,661.00 935.00
Total amount of land newly disturbed within the reporting period (in hectares) 64.00 269.00 0.00
Total amount of land newly rehabilitated within the reporting period to the agreed end use (in hectares) 0.92 3.20 0.00
Total land disturbed and not yet rehabilitated (in hectares) 3,485.65 1,926.80 935.00
MM2 The number and percentage of total sites identified as requiring biodiversity management plans according to stated criteria, and the number (percentage) of those sites with plans in place DETAILS +
Disclosure Required Rosebel Essakane Westwood
Does this site require a biodiversity management plan? Yes
(IAMGOLD Policies and Standards)
Yes
(Environmental Impact Assessment, IAMGOLD Policies and Standards)
Yes
(federal regulation – Environment Canada, IAMGOLD Policies and Standards)
Is there a biodiversity plan currently in place? No
(in development)
Yes
(covers area sensitivity and community use of biodiversity)
Yes
(covers level of impact)
Percentage of total sites with biodiversity plans in place 67%
Emissions
103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary a. An explanation of why the topic is material.  

Emissions from development, mining production and mineral processing activities have potential to affect air quality.

In particular, we recognize that greenhouse gas emissions contribute to the global issue of climate change.

Effective energy management will help control our environmental impacts by reducing the overall amount of greenhouse gases and other significant emissions produced in addition to directly influencing operational costs.

b. The Boundary for the material topic, which includes a description of:
i. where the impacts occur;
ii. the organization’s involvement with the impacts. For example, whether the organization has caused or contributed to the impacts, or is directly linked to the impacts through its business relationships.
This topic boundary is limited to biodiversity aspects related to IAMGOLD managed operations and advanced exploration sites.
c. Any specific limitation regarding the topic Boundary. Energy use at exploration and closed sites is not considered significant as there are no active production or mineral processing activities – hence, emissions are also considered non-material. Additionally, joint venture projects where IAMGOLD is not the operator are not included. Scope 3 is calculated to the extent possible with available data.
103-2 The management approach and its components  a. An explanation of how the organization manages the topic.  

GHG emissions are regularly tracked and assessed to identify opportunities to improve energy efficiency, reduce GHG emissions, and promote energy conservation and the use of renewable energy.

IAMGOLD is committed to renewable energy as exemplified by the development of the world’s largest hybrid photovoltaic heavy fuel oil plant (PV-HFO) of 15 MW at Essakane and a 5 MW solar power plant at Rosebel, as well as several smaller solar projects in support of local communities in Suriname. The 15 MV PV-HFO plant at Essakane is estimated to save around 18,500 tonnes CO2 equivalent per year.

b. A statement of the purpose of the management approach.

The purpose of management of this topic is to:

  • Comply with applicable regulatory requirements;
  • Quantify our impact by monitoring air quality to ensure effectiveness of any mitigation measures implemented to prevent any adverse effects as a result of our mining activities, and
  • Reduce emissions that contribute to climate change.
c. A description of the following, if the management approach includes that component:
i. Policies
ii. Commitments
iii. Goals and targets
iv. Responsibilities
v. Resources
vi. Grievance mechanisms
vii. Specific actions, such as processes, projects, programs and initiatives

Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Management Standard

Consistent with IAMGOLD's Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Management Standard, signed by the COO, one of our key management objectives is to reduce our emissions of greenhouse gases and resulting impacts on the environment.

Projects in Canada are typically subject to provincial air quality guidelines and approvals which seek to protect local receivers that surround the project.

We also participate in the Carbon Disclosure Project (CDP) Climate Change Disclosure.

103-3 Evaluation of the management approach For each material topic, the reporting organization shall report the following information:
a. An explanation of how the organization evaluates the management approach, including:
i. the mechanisms for evaluating the effectiveness of the management approach;
ii. the results of the evaluation of the management approach;
iii. any related adjustments to the management approach.

As a member of the Mining Association of Canada (MAC), IAMGOLD adheres to the Towards Sustainable Mining (TSM) protocols at all our sites. Every three years, it is required that an external verification be conducted to verify level of adherence with the TSM protocols. An internal audit was conducted on tailings and a TSM audit was conducted in 2018. The results of the audit are currently being reviewed to identify areas for improvement.

All IAMGOLD operations conducted the annual TSM self-assessment for the Energy and GHG Emissions Management Protocol. Annual results are available in the TSM Progress Reports.

305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions DETAILS +
Disclosure Required Rosebel Essakane Westwood
a. Total direct emissions of greenhouse gases (in metric tonnes of CO2 equivalent) from: 158,700.90 341,323.17 12,564.42
Waste 0.00 0.00 0.00
Energy – Power plant 0.00 219,866.04 0.00
Energy – Treatment plant 2,714.10 5,752.62 288.11
Energy – Extraction 145,906.51 86,072.30 12,116.07
Energy – Support activities 260.02 3,067.70 0.00
Company owned vehicles – Operations 9,820.27 0.00 160.25
Company owned vehicles – Support activities 0.00 26,564.52 0.00
b. Gases included in the calculation (CO2, CH4, N2O, HFCs, PFCs, SF6, NF3, or all) All All All
c. Biogenic CO2 emissions in metric tons of CO2 equivalent) Not applicable
d. Base year for the calculation, if applicable, including:
i. the rationale for choosing it 2013 (start of using Ecometrica software)
ii. emissions in the base year 145,485.33 199,586.01 11,561.65
iii. the context for any significant changes in emissions (in tCO2e) that triggered recalculations of base year emissions Increase of 13,216.
Processing more hard rock.
Increase of 141,737.
Mill expansion project; processing more hard rock.
Increase of 1,003.
Production ramp-up.
e. Report source of the emission factors and the global warming potential (GWP) rates used, or a reference to the GWP source GWP source: IPCC (2007). IPCC Fourth Assessment Report: Climate Change 2007. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. Use of Ecometrica platform to ensure latest emissions factors used.
f. Consolidation approach for emissions; whether equity share, financial control, or operational control Operational control
g. Standards, methodologies, assumptions, and/or calculation tools used Assessment conducted in accordance with WRI/WBCSD's Greenhouse Gas Protocol: A Corporate Accounting and Reporting Standard (Revised Edition).
305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions DETAILS +
Disclosure Required Rosebel Essakane Westwood
a. Total location-based energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions from the generation of electricity, heating, cooling, and steaming which was consumed by the organization (in metric tons of CO2) 0.00 715.77 267.08
b. If applicable, total market-based energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions in metric tons of CO2 equivalent 0.00 715.77 267.08
c. If available, the gases included in the calculation; whether CO2, CH4, N2O, HFCs, PFCs, SF6, NF3, or all All
d. Indicate base year for the calculation, if applicable, including:
i. the rationale for choosing it 2013 (start of using Ecometrica software)
ii. emissions in the base year 0.00 610.87 322.99
iii. the context for any significant changes in emissions that triggered recalculations of base year emissions Not applicable
e. Report source of the emission factors and the global warming potential (GWP) rates used, or a reference to the GWP source GWP source: IPCC (2007). IPCC Fourth Assessment Report: Climate Change 2007. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. Use of Ecometrica platform to ensure latest emissions factors used.
f. Report consolidation approach for emissions; whether equity share, financial control, or operational control Operational control.
g. Report standards, methodologies, assumptions, and/or calculation tools used Assessment conducted in accordance with WRI/WBCSD's Greenhouse Gas Protocol: A Corporate Accounting and Reporting Standard (Revised Edition).
305-3 Other indirect (Scope 3) GHG emissions DETAILS +
Disclosure Required Rosebel Essakane Westwood
a. Total other indirect (Scope 3) GHG emissions that are a consequence of an organization's activities, but occur from sources not owned or controlled by the organization (in metric tons of CO2) 3,621.36 1,174.71 601.56
b. If available, the gases included in the calculation; whether CO2, CH4, N2O, HFCs, PFCs, SF6, NF3, or all All
c. Biogenic CO2 emissions in metric tons of CO2 equivalent Not applicable
d. Other indirect (Scope 3) GHG emissions categories and activities included in the calculation Business travel, waste generated in operations, upstream transportation and distribution. Business travel, waste generated in operations. Business travel, waste generated in operations.
e. Report base year for the calculation, if applicable, including:
i. the rationale for choosing it 2013 (start of using Ecometrica software)
ii. emissions in the base year 3,392.09 2,509.16 396.21
iii. the context for any significant changes in emissions that triggered recalculations of base year emissions Not applicable
f. Report source of the emission factors and the global warming potential (GWP) rates used, or a reference to the GWP source GWP source: IPCC (2007). IPCC Fourth Assessment Report: Climate Change 2007. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. Use of Ecometrica platform to ensure latest emissions factors used.
g. Report standards, methodologies, assumptions, and/or calculation tools used Assessment conducted in accordance with WRI/WBCSD's Greenhouse Gas Protocol: A Corporate Accounting and Reporting Standard (Revised Edition).
305-4 GHG emissions intensity DETAILS +
Disclosure Required Rosebel Essakane Westwood
a. GHG emissions intensity ratio for the organization
i. Total GHG emissions (in tonnes of CO2e) 158,700.90 342,038.95 12,831.51
ii. GHG intensity – Mill (kg CO2e/tonne milled) 12.37 24.62 20.57
iii. GHG intensity – Mine (kg CO2e/tonne moved) 2.44 6.46 11.01
b. Organization-specific metric (the denominator) chosen to calculate the ratio
i. Thousand tonnes of treated (milled) ore 12,832.07 13,890.95 623.88
ii. Thousand tonnes of moved ore and waste 65,006.74 52,967.12 1,165.07
c. Types of GHG emissions included in the intensity ratio; whether direct (Scope 1), energy indirect (Scope 2), and/or other indirect (Scope 3) Scope 1 and 2 (location) Scope 1 and 2 (location) Scope 1 and 2 (location)
d. Gases included in the calculation; whether CO2, CH4, N2O, HFCs, PFCs, SF6, NF3, or all All
305-5 Reduction of GHG emissions DETAILS +
Disclosure Required Rosebel Essakane Westwood
a. GHG emissions reduced as a direct result of reduction initiatives, in metric tons of CO2 equivalent 6,200 tCO2e
(5 MW solar plant at Rosebel)
Development of 15 MW solar project (inauguration planned for 2018) Not applicable
b. Gases included in the calculation; whether CO2, CH4, N2O, HFCs, PFCs, SF6, NF3, or all All
c. Report base year or baseline, including the rationale for choosing it 2013 (start of using Ecometrica software)
d. Scopes in which reductions took place; whether direct (Scope 1), energy indirect (Scope 2), and/or other indirect (Scope 3) Scope 1 Not applicable Not applicable
e. Report standards, methodologies, assumptions, and/or calculation tools used Standard emission factors
305-7 Nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur oxides (SOx), and other significant air emissions DETAILS +
Disclosure Required Rosebel Essakane Westwood
a. Significant air emissions, in kilograms, for each of the following: Sampling is conducted at the main sources of emissions. Data in ppm only.
i. NOx Not available, data not tracked. Plans to capture data for 2018. Not available, data not tracked. Plans to capture data for 2018. 11,000.00
ii. SOx 23.00
iii. Persistent organic pollutants (POP) 0.00
iv. Volatile organic compounds (VOC) 210.00
v. Hazardous air pollutants (HAP) 0.00
vi. Particulate matter (PM) 12.00
vii. Other standard categories of air emissions identified in relevant regulations 0.00
b. Report source of the emission factors used PM10 has been measured at Mill, Old Camp, New Camp and Main Gate in 2017. The following average value has been recorded: Mill: 0.26 µg/m3; New Camp: 0.67 µg/m3; Main Gate: 0.31 µg/m3; Old Camp: 0.99 µg/m3. Point measurements for PM; data on total quantities not available.
0.02 mg/MJ average for power plant ducts; 75 mg/m3 avg for all over ducts on the site.
United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) AP-42
c. Report standards, methodologies, assumptions, and/or calculation tools used The USEPA Primary Ambient Air Quality Standard of 150 µg/m3 averaged over a 24-hour period is used as standard. MiniVol TAS air samplers were used to measure the PM10 concentration during the dry season (early February to late April and mid-August to early December) for a period of 24 hours, once every 6 days. IFC Environmental, Health and Safety Guidelines for Thermal Power Plants; Decree n°2001-185 outlines the discharge standards for pollutants in air, water and soil. Canadian energy partnership for enviromental innovation calculator (National Pollutant Release Inventory (NPRI) toolbox)
Effluents and Waste
103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary a. An explanation of why the topic is material.  

Guided by our vision of Zero Harm, we closely monitor the waste and tailings produced as well as the quality of final effluent during mining operations and post-closure.

Waste management includes waste rock, tailings, and other waste streams (hazardous and non-hazardous waste).

b. The Boundary for the material topic, which includes a description of:
i. where the impacts occur;
ii. the organization’s involvement with the impacts. For example, whether the organization has caused or contributed to the impacts, or is directly linked to the impacts through its business relationships.
This topic boundary includes all IAMGOLD managed operations. Exploration and closed sites are included, where applicable.
c. Any specific limitation regarding the topic Boundary.

Effluents and waste from joint venture projects where IAMGOLD is not the operator are not included.

Judgement of subject matter experts is relied upon to define what is considered significant.

103-2 The management approach and its components  a. An explanation of how the organization manages the topic.  

Deposition plans are required for waste rock and tailings. Water and sediment quality monitoring is routinely conducted. Standard operating procedures are developed and maintained for material processes such as management of hazardous waste at our operating sites and spill response.

In Burkina Faso, IAMGOLD’s Essakane mine provides an opportunity for the mine’s scrap metal to be repurposed through the “Fonds Fer” or “Iron Fund” Program. The mine sells its leftover scrap metal at auction and uses the revenues to fund local business ideas.

b. A statement of the purpose of the management approach.

The purpose of management of this topic is to:

  • Comply with applicable regulatory requirements;
  • Ensure waste streams are handled, stored and transported appropriately to prevent accidental release to the surrounding environment;
  • Quantify our impact by monitoring water quality to ensure effectiveness of any mitigation measures implemented to prevent any adverse effects as a result of our mining activities; and
  • Ensure protection of the receiving environment.
c. A description of the following, if the management approach includes that component:
i. Policies
ii. Commitments
iii. Goals and targets
iv. Responsibilities
v. Resources
vi. Grievance mechanisms
vii. Specific actions, such as processes, projects, programs and initiatives

Our internal Sustainability Standard outlines the minimum requirements for waste management.

Tailings Management Standard

As per our tailings management standard, we locate, design, construct, operate and close tailings facilities in compliance with the Mining Association of Canada’s (MAC) environmental policy, and with our commitment to stakeholders in mind. We ensure that all structures are stable, and all solids and water are managed within their designated areas.

An accidental spill or release can be hazardous to our employees and other stakeholders, and can also contaminate the environment if not responded in a quick and effective manner.

We aim to prevent material spills and have spill response procedures to respond appropriately and minimize impacts to the receiving environment.

103-3 Evaluation of the management approach For each material topic, the reporting organization shall report the following information:
a. An explanation of how the organization evaluates the management approach, including:
i. the mechanisms for evaluating the effectiveness of the management approach;
ii. the results of the evaluation of the management approach;
iii. any related adjustments to the management approach.

As a member of the Mining Association of Canada (MAC), IAMGOLD adheres to the Towards Sustainable Mining (TSM) protocols at all our sites. Every three years, it is required that an external verification be conducted to verify level of adherence with the TSM protocols. An internal audit was conducted on tailings and a TSM audit was conducted in 2018. The results of the audit are currently being reviewed to identify areas for improvement.

All IAMGOLD operations conducted the annual TSM self-assessment for the Tailings Management Protocol and Crisis Management and Communications Planning Protocol.

Tailings Management Protocol

Crisis Management and Communications Planning

Annual results are available in the TSM Progress Reports.

306-1 Water discharge by quality and destination DETAILS +
Disclosure Required Rosebel Essakane Westwood
a. Total volume (m3) of planned and unplanned water discharges (i.e., excluding harvested rainwater and domestic sewage) by: 2,844,835.00 0.00 3,859,876.00
i. destination Mindrineti River (surface water)

Essakane is a site with “zero discharge” – no water used for industrial purposes is discharged to the environment.

Water used for mineral processing is recycled for further mineral processing needs. Mine water is stored in a basin until being used.

Domestic waste water is treated then sent to an evaporation field where trees are planted.

Rivière Bousquet
ii. quality of the water, including treatment method Prior to discharge, water is treated by the Effluent Treatment Plant and aerated in the Aerated Lagoon to meet IFC discharge criteria and end-of-pipe target discharge objectives. Not applicable;
“zero discharge” site
Treated with lime
iii. whether the water was reused by another organization No, but small-scale mining in the area. No, but there is a presence of artisanal small-scale mining in the area. No
b. Report standards, methodologies, and assumptions used IFC limits for the discharge of process waste water to the surface water (WB, IFC Guidelines 2007). And end-of-pipe target discharge objectives set by RGM for Ammonia and Total Cyanide. Not applicable Discharge is measured with a flowmeter on a routine basis.
306-2 Waste by type and disposal method DETAILS +
Disclosure Required Rosebel Essakane Westwood Corporate
a. Total weight of hazardous waste, with a breakdown by the following disposal methods where applicable: 6,860.99 1,318.96 227.17
i. Reuse (kg or tonnes and disposal method) Not available 0.00 Not available Not available
ii. Recycling (kg or tonnes and disposal method) 6,352.78 1,179.75 0.00 Mali: 780 kg (empty plastic water bottles – sold in town to be reused as local juice containers)
Senegal: not available
Colombia: not available
Brazil: not available
Ontario: not available
Peru: not available
Quebec: not available
Suriname: not available
Burkina Faso: not available
iii. Composting (kg or tonnes and disposal method) 0.00 0.00 Not available Not available
iv. Recovery, including energy recovery 0.00 0.00 Not available Not available
v. Incineration (mass burn) (kg or tonnes and disposal method) 508.21 0.88 227.17 Mali: not available
Senegal: 600 L used oil (around 580 kg) by incineration
Colombia: not available
Brazil: not available
Ontario: not available
Peru: not available
Quebec: not available
Suriname: not available
Burkina Faso: not available
vi. Deep well injection (kg or tonnes and disposal method) Not available
vii. Landfill (kg or tonnes and disposal method) 0.00 138.33 0.00 Not available
viii. On-site storage (kg or tonnes and disposal method) 0.00 0.00 0.00 Mali: 2,239 kg of used engine oil (to be submitted to a certified treatment plant)
Senegal: not available
Colombia: not available
Brazil: not available
Ontario: not available
Peru: not available
Quebec: not available
Suriname: not available
Burkina Faso: not available
b. Total weight of non-hazardous waste, with a breakdown by the following disposal methods where applicable: 1,107.82 794.80 1,942.25
i. Reuse (kg or tonnes and disposal method) 1.54 0.00 Not available Mali: not available
Senegal: not available
Colombia: 4,400 kg of sacks used for temporary soil storage in platform construction were reused
Brazil: not available
Ontario: not available
Peru: not available
Quebec: not available
Suriname: not available
Burkina Faso: not available
ii. Recycling (kg or tonnes and disposal method) 26.76 416.99 1,544.90 Mali: not available
Senegal: not available
Colombia: 444.4 kg of glass, aluminum, plastic, paper and cardboard were sent to a recycling company operated by members of the local community.
Brazil: not available
Ontario: not available
Peru: not available
Quebec: 500 kg of paper
Suriname: not available
Burkina Faso: not available
iii. Composting (kg or tonnes and disposal method) Not available 0.00 Not available Not available
iv. Recovery, including energy recovery (kg or tonnes and disposal method) Not available 0.00 Not available Not available
v. Incineration (mass burn) (kg or tonnes and disposal method) Not available 0.00 Not available Not available
vi. Deep well injection (kg or tonnes and disposal method) Not available 0.00 Not available Not available
vii. Landfill (kg or tonnes and disposal method) 1,079.52 377.81 397.35 Mali: 1,500 kg of various waste (submitted to a waste treatment plant at Bamako)
Senegal: 6 tonnes
Colombia: Ordinary and organic waste 436.5 kg
Brazil: not available
Ontario: not available
Peru: not available
Quebec: not available
Suriname: not available
Burkina Faso: not available
viii. On-site storage (kg or tonnes and disposal method) Not available 0.00 Not available Mali: not available
Senegal: not available
Colombia: not available
Brazil: not available
Ontario: not available
Peru: 445 kg
Quebec: not available
Suriname: not available
Burkina Faso: not available
ix. Other (to be specified by the organization) Not available 0.00 Not available Mali: not available
Senegal: not available
Colombia: not available
Brazil: not available
Ontario: not available
Peru: 445 kg
Quebec: not available
Suriname: not available
Burkina Faso: not available
c. How the waste disposal method has been determined:
i. Disposed of directly by the organization, or otherwise directly confirmed Hazardous waste landfill, non-hazardous waste landfill Hazardous waste incineration, non-hazardous waste recycling, non-hazardous waste landfill Not available Mali: not available
Senegal: not available
Colombia: Non-recyclable materials are disposed by the public waste services company at the local landfill.
Brazil: not available
Ontario: not available
Peru: not available
Quebec: not available
Suriname: not available
Burkina Faso: not available
ii. Information provided by the waste disposal contractor Non-hazardous waste reuse Hazardous waste recycling, hazardous waste landfill Hazardous waste incineration, non-hazardous waste recycling, non-hazardous waste landfill Mali: not available
Senegal: not available
Colombia: (i) Quimetales SAS delivered a Certificate of Storage, Management of the Treatment and/or Use of Hazardous Waste. The company has government’s environment licence. (ii) Policy and procedures of public waste services company.
Brazil: not available
Ontario: not available
Peru: not available
Quebec: not available
Suriname: not available
Burkina Faso: not available
iii. Organizational defaults of the waste disposal contractor Hazardous waste recycling, hazardous waste incineration, non-hazardous waste recycling Not available Not available Not available
306-3 Significant spills DETAILS +
Disclosure Required Rosebel Essakane Westwood
a. Total number and total volume of recorded significant spills (m3) None None None
b. The following additional information for each spill that was reported in the organization’s financial statements:
i. Location of spill Not applicable
iii. Material of spill, categorized by: oil spills (soil or water surfaces), fuel spills (soil or water surfaces), spills of wastes (soil or water surfaces), spills of chemicals (mostly soil or water surfaces), and other (to be specified by the organization) Not applicable
c. Impacts of significant spills Not applicable
306-4 Transport of hazardous waste DETAILS +
Disclosure Required Rosebel Essakane Westwood
a. Total weight of hazardous waste (tonnes):
i. Hazardous waste transported 3,609.35 Not applicable 227.17
ii. Hazardous waste imported Not applicable 0.00 0.00
iii. Hazardous waste exported 3,609.30 0.00 0.00
iv. Hazardous waste treated 7,057.52 Not applicable 227.17
b. Percentage of hazardous waste shipped internationally 51% 0% 0%
c. Report standards, methodologies, and assumptions used Unit conversions via Ecometrica.
  • BASEL Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal adopted by the Plenipotentiary Conference on March 22, 1989, Implemented in Burkina Faso on May 5, 1992;
  • Bamako Convention on the Prohibition on the Importation of Hazardous Wastes, the Control of Transboundary Transfers and the Management of Waste Within African Countries, signed on January 30, 1991;
  • Decree regulating the collection, storage, transportation, treatment and disposal of urban waste
Provided by the waste disposal contractor.
306-5 Water bodies affected by water discharges and/or runoff DETAILS +
Disclosure Required Rosebel Essakane Westwood
a. Water bodies and related habitats that are significantly affected by water discharges and/or runoff, including information on:
i. the size of the water body and related habitat The Mindrineti River (downstream of Mamanari Creek) is the only perennial stream in the area, with a large drainage area of 704 km2, located mostly to the south and upstream of the Concession. None Not applicable
ii. whether the water body and related habitat is designated as a nationally or internationally protected area No Not applicable Not applicable
iii. the biodiversity value, such as total number of protected species According to an aquatic ecosystems survey conducted in November 2017, 22 fish species and 52 specimens of macro-invertebrates were collected downstream of the discharge point (Mindrineti Creek). None of these species is protected. Not applicable Not applicable
(no protected species on the site)
MM3 Total amounts of overburden, rock, tailings, and sludges and their associated risks DETAILS +
Disclosure Required Rosebel Essakane Westwood
Total amount of overburden (waste rock) generated during the year (in tonnes) 47,802,231.00 35,696,535.00 640,963.00
Describe the risks associated with overburden (including waste rock) Risks related to runoff on waste rock dumps. Procedures in place for waste rock dumps. Risks related to runoff on waste rock dumps. Acid rock drainage (ARD) potential.
Total amount of tailings (including sludges) generated during the year (in tonnes) 12,832,069.00 11,749,255.00 785,660.00
Describe the risks associated with tailings Risks related to tailings line rupture and/or dam breach. Procedures in place for the tailings storage facility. Risks related to tailings line ruptures, breakage of geomembrane covering interior of the TSF and/or dam breach. Contamination of groundwater. Overtopping of water from TSF. Acid rock drainage (ARD) potential.
Environmental Compliance
103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary a. An explanation of why the topic is material.  

As per our Sustainability Policy, we are committed to establishing site operating standards and procedures to enable practices that meet or exceed relevant laws and regulations, IAMGOLD’s environmental and social impact statements, environmental and social management and closure plans, and international protocols of which IAMGOLD is a signatory. We are vigilant about compliance and ensure any non-compliance is remediated swiftly.

Sustainability Policy

b. The Boundary for the material topic, which includes a description of:
i. where the impacts occur;
ii. the organization’s involvement with the impacts. For example, whether the organization has caused or contributed to the impacts, or is directly linked to the impacts through its business relationships.
This topic boundary includes all IAMGOLD managed sites.
c. Any specific limitation regarding the topic Boundary.

Joint venture projects where IAMGOLD is not the operator are not included.

103-2 The management approach and its components  a. An explanation of how the organization manages the topic.  

Sites are expected to meet or exceed relevant environmental laws and regulations.

b. A statement of the purpose of the management approach.

The purpose of management of this topic is to:

  • Comply with applicable regulatory requirements; and
  • Promote accountability and transparency.
c. A description of the following, if the management approach includes that component:
i. Policies
ii. Commitments
iii. Goals and targets
iv. Responsibilities
v. Resources
vi. Grievance mechanisms
vii. Specific actions, such as processes, projects, programs and initiatives

Sustainability Policy

Tailings Management Standard

It is essential to address feedback and concerns in an accessible and timely manner in order to continuously improve. As stated in our Sustainability Policy, we are committed to practising good corporate governance, transparency and fair dealing and reporting annually on our performance.

This commitment is complemented by our Tailings Management Standard, which states that consultations with communities of interest are organized to take into account their concerns relating to tailings facility management.

We are committed to avoiding and/or minimizing, to an extent that is technically feasible and fiscally reasonable, any negative impacts from our mining activities.

As part of our commitment, we partnered with UQAT-Polytechnique’s Research Institute on Mines and Environment (RIME) in 2012 to support new development in environmental practices including tailings rehabilitation. Our financial commitment of $1.5 million over five years enabled various research projects such as desulfurization of residue cover and sludge cover. With the approval of the Government of Quebec of our closure plan, IAMGOLD hopes to integrate some of the practices being researched at RIME. In 2017, IAMGOLD committed $2 million to Laurentian University over five years in support of maintaining faculty positions in open pit mining and engineering. Part of the funds will go towards completing a new student space and upgrading student facilities as well as creating new scholarships and bursaries for undergraduate and masters students.

103-3 Evaluation of the management approach For each material topic, the reporting organization shall report the following information:
a. An explanation of how the organization evaluates the management approach, including:
i. the mechanisms for evaluating the effectiveness of the management approach;
ii. the results of the evaluation of the management approach;
iii. any related adjustments to the management approach.

As per IAMGOLD Sustainability Standard, a community and stakeholder engagement plan is required for all of our sites to ensure feedback can be received and considered.

A formal grievance mechanism is in place for dealing with complaints and/or concerns from external stakeholders. Stakeholders are well informed of the grievance mechanism which is easily accessible. The Company reports back to communities periodically with the outcomes of the grievances filed. Senior management reviews the engagement system and results annually.

A gap analysis on IAMGOLD's sustainability framework was conducted in 2018. Results of the analysis are currently under review to identify areas for improvement.

307-1 Non-compliance with environmental laws and regulations DETAILS +
Disclosure Required Rosebel Essakane Westwood Corporate
a. Significant fines and non-monetary sanctions for non-compliance with environmental laws and/or regulations in terms of:
i. total monetary value of significant fines (USD); 0 0 0 0
ii. total number of non-monetary sanctions; 0 0 0 0
iii. cases brought through dispute resolution mechanisms 0 0 0 0
b. If the organization has not identified any non-compliance with environmental laws and/or regulations, a brief statement of this fact is sufficient In 2017, no non-compliance with environmental laws and/or regulations was identified. Note that although there were no reported fines or sanctions, several events were reported. At Essakane, domestic waste water discharge criteria was not always respected. BOD and COD as well as streptococci and faecal colliform plants are often not out of the ordinary. An action plan is being implemented. NOx emissions at the power plant are not in line with the national standard for emissions from fixed installations.